Some of you would think that the series is more on fan-service as other conventional storyline of a reverse harem series – a female protagonist being protected by these good-looking guys all the time even to deadliest challenge they would encounter. Code:Breaker isn’t the series you think you’ll get to see loads of fan-service. In fact, this series isn’t just all about the dazzling characters with their heavenly words, seductive gestures and the typical scenario of a female protagonist who acts as the queen of the series and is lucky enough to have supporters around her. As you start watching the series, you might change your view. You had a wrong impression, perhaps.

Meet Sakurakouji who, while riding in a bus one night, sees a man along the way who burns a group of people. With much shock, she takes a look at the site the next day, however, there are no evidences that a murder has been done. As she goes to class, she discovers that the transfer student is the same as the guy whom she saw one night. Soonafter, she learns that the student is Rei Ogami, the sixth member of Code:Braker, an organization with special abilities who serves the government. Bounded by the Code of Hammurabi, Ogami possesses an antagonistic persona since he considers himself as an evil whose role in the world is  to eliminate trash, which means he has to kill people who does evil things in the world. Though his action passes judgement more than the government can do, he doesn’t consider himself as a hero.

As ancient history goes, Code of Hammurabi has something to do with punishment, a more rigid law, so that people will not commit evil acts in the society. There may be a dilemma among viewers of the series whether they should value the code, which is “An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth”, with Ogami’s addition of “Evil for evil”. In some ways, it is fair that it brings justice to the society, enforces and consolidates the law and lessens serious crimes. However, our female protagonist isn’t favor with the code, mostly evident in the first few episodes, but soon realizes that there are reasons behind every actions that have been done.

Code:Breaker is a good action-packed anime with the involvement of supernatural scenes as characters possess special abilities that ordinary humans do not have.  Throughout the 13 episodes, the series spends most of the time featuring the role of the male characters in the society, the so-called Code Breakers. Though Sakurakouji should play the widest role in the series, at least, she isn’t the type of girl who seeks attention in order for her to be protected all the time. I just like how the creator made a good, well-refined female protagonist in a reverse harem series. Male characters are undeniably gorgeous, but they aren’t just about looks as they make you amazed by their intellectual capabilities, physical strength and magical prowess. However, I was not satisfied with the character development due to the fact that Ogami is mostly given the highlights among the members of Code Breaker.

The flow of the story becomes fast and feels like a rush as you reach the second half of the episodes yet maintains a good animation including the fight scenes which satisfy your craving for great action, however, magical attacks are overused in the series which can be tiring in some points, and the time length of the battle scenes should have been longer.

With regards to the theme songs, the opening song titled “Dark Shame” by Granrodeo is good and I even included it as one of my favorite anime songs. It has also catchy lines when it is translated in English. Whilst the ending theme titled “White Crow” by Kenichi Suzumura  has a rock beat with a dark ambiance in the music video which fits well towards the mood of the song, but it needs a good and lively animation.

Overall, this anime is simply good, and it needs improvement in some aspects. I guess, the series deserves to have its second season because there are still things that are not neatly explained in the series.

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